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Kusler-Grosz Family Collection

Kulm, North Dakota

Grosz Family Photographs

Photographs courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy

Both Kusler and Schäfer families originated from Palatinate, Germany, as founding families of former Black Sea German village of Worms, Beresan District, South Russia in 1807 (today north of Odessa, Ukraine). These same families immigrated in the “second group to America” in 1871 to pause in Sandusky, Ohio, while sending out land-survey scouts to Sutton, Nebraska, and Yankton, Dakota. The Kusler-Schäfer families were pioneer settlers in 1972 at Odessa Reformed (near Lesterville, Dakota Territory) and later moved to Scotland, South Dakota. Some Kusler sons were pioneer homesteaders in northern McIntosh County (near Fredonia and Kulm, North Dakota) in 1884.

Johann Kusler, Jr., of Scotland, South Dakota, was married in January 1894 to Magdalena Grosz of Parkston, South Dakota, before homesteading in McIntosh County. The Grosz family were founders of rural Gnadenfeld Congregational Church [oldest German “classis” church in North Dakota], south of Kulm, North Dakota. Johann Grosz, Sr., with George Gäckle and George Billigmeier, originating from former German villages of Kulm and Leipzig, Bessarabia (today west of Odessa, Ukraine), were the three co-founders of town site in 1892 to be named Kulm, North Dakota.

Both Grosz and Dietrich families originated from Wuerttemburg, Germany, through former German village of Neuberg, (Leibental am Baraboi District, South Russia), to settle in former German villages of Kulm and Beresina, Bessarabia, (today west of Odessa, Ukraine). Two significant textiles for worship-garb were inherited through Justina Dietrich (Mrs. Daniel Grosz) of Scotland, South Dakota. Justina’s family originates from former German village of Beresina, Bessarabia, along with her maternal Bader family in neighboring Paris village.

Clara Kusler assembled a collection of “sprühle”/scripture memory cards near Kulm, North Dakota, before her marriage in 1921 as Mrs. John Mayer. Impressive color-lithgraphy of floral motifs with Bible verses decorate Clara’s memorizing cards.

Donated items include photographs, postcards, sprüle, and textiles. They were donated by Clara’s sister, Adeline Kusler McCloy, to the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection in 2002.


Family Histories:
1. Kusler, Walter M. The Kuslers and their descendents. Kulm, ND: W. Kusler, 1983. *Germans from Russia CS71.K969 1983.

2. Piatz, Lorraine Leier. Family history of Joseph Leier & Caroline (Grosz) Leier & Clara (Grosz) Leier. Napoleon, ND: Napoleon Homestead, 1996. *Germans from Russia CS71.L525 1996.


Town & County Histories:
1. Flegel, Zona. The origin of Kulm. np: np, nd. *Institute for Regional Studies Small Collection 425.

2. Freeman, Mike. Menno, the first 100 years, 1879-1979. Menno, SD: the City of Menno, 1979. *Germans from Russia F659.M46F73 1979.

3. Hutchinson County, South Dakota 1880 census. Lakewood, Ohio: R. J. Seibert, 1980. *Germans from Russia F657.H85H87.

4. Kulm centennial, 1892-1992. np: The Centennial Book Committee, 1992. *Institute for Regional Studies F644.K85K86 1992.

5 . Kulm diamond jubilee, Kulm, North Dakota: June 26 & 27, 1967. Kulm, ND: J. E. Peters, 1967. *Institute for Regional Studies F644.K85K85 1967.

6. Kulm, N. Dak., 1892 to 1957. Kulm, ND: The Committee, 1957. *Institute for Regional Studies F644.K85K85 1957.

7 . Parkston, South Dakota, centennial history. Parkston, SD: Joan M. Hafner and the Parkston Commercial Club, 1985. *Germans from Russia F659.P37P37 1985.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_11:
Daniel Grosz and Christina Dietrich Grosz celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary in this portrait, circa 1921, in Fredonia, North Dakota. Their children include August, Martha, and Willie (Martha and Willie died of diphtheria as teenagers at Scotland, Dakota Territory, before family moved to Fredonia in 1902.) Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_14:
The first homesteader families to the Kulm town site were Grosz and Gaeckle families, originally from the ancestral villages of Kulm and Leipzig, Bessarabia. This very early panorama photo of Kulm, North Dakota, circa 1892-1896, was taken by first pioneer photographer John Reiman, who moved his photo business from Menno and Parkston, South Dakota. Fred W. Kempf, also know as “Abbie” (ah-bee), originally from Beresina, Bessarabia, was the second photographer to establish in Kulm. [George Gackle's square house is shown in center of photograph; he gave the name of Kulm for the post office.]

Excerpted from Kulm 1957 Jubilee History Book, page six: “Kulm’s first photographer was John Reiman, followed by Fred W. Kempf. Later Abbie Kempf was major photographer circa 1906-1940 (and brass horn musician of 30-35 member Kulm Brass Band until 1950). Christian Krause was also a major pioneer photographer; but he was wealthy photographic hobbyist for experimental images. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_19:
Family portrait of Daniel Grosz and Justina Dietrich with children (except two youngest sons), circa 1885, at Parkston, Dakota Territory. [Parents to Magdalena Grosz Kusler and grandparents to Adeline Kusler McCloy.] Daniel Grosz (born 1 July 1846, Kulm, Bessarabia; died 1919, Parkston, South Dakota) married in 1865 or 1867 in Grosz home at Kulm, Bessarabia, to Justina Dietrich Grosz (born 6 August 1849, Beresina, Bessarabia; died 1929, Parkston, South Dakota). They immigrated to America circa 1877. Seven of nine children depicted are:
1) Lydia Grosz (born 5 September 1868, Bessarabia), married John Grosz, Junior (distant cousin).
2) Gottfried Grosz (born 4 September 1870, Kulm, Bessarabia), blacksmith at Parkston, South Dakota.
3) Magdalena Grosz Kusler (born 24 July 1872, Kulm, Bessarabia), married to Johann Kusler, Junior at Parkston, South Dakota, before homesteading to Lynch, Nebraska; Parkston, South Dakota, and finally Kulm, North Dakota in 1902.
4) Nathaniel (“Dan”) Grosz (born 7 March 1874, Kulm, Bessarabia), meat butcher at Parkston, South Dakota.
5) Marie Grosz Schoessler (born 14 June 1879, Parkston, Dakota Territory), married George Schoessler, grain merchant at Anamoose, North Dakota.
6) Marie Grosz (born 4 July 1881, Parkston, Dakota Territory).
7) Emmanuel Grosz (born 1 November 1883, Parkston, Dakota Territory).
8) Salomon John (“Samuel”) Grosz (born 7 November 1886, Parkston, Dakota Territory) not in photo.
9) Emil Grosz (born 29 October 1890, Parkston, South Dakota), mail post clerk at Yankton, South Dakota. (not in photo). Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_21:
Probably infant of Gottfried and Maria Grosz, Parkston, South Dakota. [Refer to photo #26.] This one year infant photo is a visual classic art photograph with compositional design textures juxtapositioned with lace eyelet gown, smocked tuft pillow and wrapped wicker “peacock” chair. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_22:
Dorothea’s two-year-old toddler photo, 1906, at Edgemont, South Dakota is daughter of Emmanuel and Emilia Grosz. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_23:
This photo postcard was sent in 18 February 1910 from Emmanuel and Emilia Grosz’s older daughter Dorothea at Edgemont, South Dakota, to her grandparents Daniel and Justina Grosz at Parkston, South Dakota. This particular winter snow scene shows Dorothea Grosz with her younger sister holding delicate bisque-head dolls, while standing on a floral bordered, double-weave woolen blanket, draped on the teamster’s seat of an “Old Hickory” bobsled. Also, eight young puppies are arranged on the dashboard of this bob-sled. The photograph is by Leeland Art and Manufacturing Company, Mitchell, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_24:
Seventeen years portrait of Gottfried Grosz (born 4 September 1870, Kulm Bessarabia) in 1887 in Parkston, Dakota Territory. He is the brother of Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photographer is R.L. Beattie, Parkston, Dakota Territory. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_25:
This photograph had Kenneth, Agnes, and Charlotte (“Lottie”) Grosz, the youngest children of Gottfried Grosz, blacksmith in Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1913-1915. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_26:
Marie (“Mary”) Grosz, wife of Gottfried Grosz, with one infant son: either John, Cornelius, Conrad, or Walter, at Parkston where Gottfried was a blacksmith, circa 1908-1921. Photographer was Schneller Photo Studio, Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_27:
This picture postcard shows Gottfried Grosz (born in 1870 in Kulm, Bessarabia) with his older sons John and Cornelius standing on a wicker chair, circa 1906-1908 at Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_28:
Casual photo of Gottfried Grosz standing at the door of his forge shop for blacksmithing, circa 1916 Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_29:
Photo of Gottfried Grosz’s four older sons (John, Cornelius, Conrad, and Walter) posed long-saddle on stuffed mule with white nose in Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo-Kulm-ND_30:
The four young grandsons of Daniel Grosz are attractive lads in Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1905. The two lads (left) are Edward and Carl, the sons of Nathaniel “Dan” Grosz; the two lads (right) are Edmund and Albert, the sons of Solomon “John” Grosz. Their brother Gottfried Grosz had seven or eight children; the three youngest were Charlotte (“Lottie”), Agnes, and Kenneth. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_31:
Barnyard photo of “Uncle Dan” (Nathaniel Grosz, born in Kulm, Bessarabia) showing off his prized Morgan horse harnessed to a “racing sulky” cart, Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1941. Dan was a meat butcher at Parkston, also brother of Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_32:
A country pasture photographer showing off the pride of a new 1914 automobile by owner Nathaniel “Dan” Grosz, with his wife Emma Miller Grosz (left) and lady-friend as back-seat passengers. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_33:
Reverend Daniel Schurr and Marie Grosz Schurr (sister of Magdalena Grosz Kusler) with their twin grandchildren of daughter Clara Schurr Klein, circa 1947. Daniel Schurr was district pastor for German Congregational Churches of North Dakota, Jamestown, North Dakota. Their daughter Clara married Jake Klein of Jamestown, North Dakota having formerly farmed at Kulm, North Dakota. Clara was registered nurse at State Hospital, Jamestown. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_34:
A high fashion hat worn by Sophie Grosz, previous to marrying George Schoessler, grain buyer at Anamoose (McHenry County), North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_35:
Portrait of Sophie Grosz Schoessler, circa 1910, Parkston, South Dakota; later Mrs. George Schoessler of Anamoose, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_36:
Interior office portrait of George Schoessler in January 1913, as grain buyer on the Soo Line Railroad, Anamoose, North Dakota. His wife is Sophie Grosz Schoessler, formerly of Parkston, South Dakota and Kulm, North Dakota. Photographer is probably P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_37:
Sophie Grosz Schoessler (right), Anamoose, North Dakota, standing next to her Norwegian-American neighbor friend, Mrs. Mantz. Seated on an elaborately-carved acanthus-leaved oak chair are: Irva Schoessler (left), Marie Schoessler (right) and Mantz daughter (center), circa 1913-1916. Photographer is P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_38:
Marie Schoessler (left) holding infant sister Irva, Anamoose, North Dakota, circa 1908. Photographer is P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. They are first cousins of Adeline Kusler McCloy. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_39:
Photo, circa 1913, of Irva Schoessler (left) and older sister Marie Schoessler (right) holding sheet music, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photographer is P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. This postcard photo belonged to their aunt Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_40:
Photo of (left) Irva Schoessler, (2nd left) Marie Schoessler, and two Mantz daughters, Anamoose, North Dakota, circa 1910. Photographer is P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_41:
Marie Schoessler, oldest daughter of George Schoessler and Sophie Grosz Schoessler, Anamoose, North Dakota, circa 1910. Photographer is P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_42:
Portrait of Marie Schoessler (born 1902), circa 1908, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photographer is P.A. Helm, Anamoose, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_43:
Circa 1910-1912, bookmark profile portrait photo of Emil Grosz, son of Daniel Grosz and Justina Dietrich Grosz, also youngest brother of Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Emil, born in 1890’s was postal worker at Yankton, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_44:
Business card/ephemeral, circa 1920, of poem “Blacksmith’s Dream” in English text, by Carl P. Grosz, son of Nathaniel “Ben” Grosz, at Ethan, South Dakota. Carl was a nephew of blacksmith Gottfried Grosz and Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_45:
Interior photograph of Nathaniel “Dan” Grosz’s butcher shop in Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1905. “Dan” stands at one round-head butcher block, while his young son Carl stands (far right). Carl Grosz later was blacksmith and automobile engine mechanic at Ethan, South Dakota. Carl’s uncle Gottfried was blacksmith at Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_46:
This “Cabinet Portrait” is youth photo of Johann Grosz, Senior, (born in 1847 in Kulm, Bessarabia), before immigrating in 1878 to Menno, Dakota Territory (later South Dakota). The R.M. Kapelnikov photo novelty company of Odessa city in Kherson Province, South Russia, advertised an extensive photography negative archive. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_47:
Nathaniel (“Dan”) Grosz, circa 1886 photograph, a seventeen year portrait as a rite of passage to manhood, before photographer John Reiman relocated to Kulm, North Dakota by 1892. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_48:
Photo portrait of Salomon John (“Samuel”) Grosz (born 1886), Nathaniel “Ben” Grosz (born 1874) and Gottfried Grosz (born 1870), four oldest sons of Daniel Grosz (native of Kulm, Bessarabia) and Justina Dietrich (native of Beresina, Bessarabia), Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1906. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy, niece of these four Grosz uncles.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_49:
Salomon “John” Grosz, younger brother of Magdalena Grosz Kusler, was born 1886 in Parkston, Dakota Territory (later South Dakota) of parents Daniel Grosz and Justina Dietrich Grosz. “John” Grosz was married, circa 1905-1910, to wife Emilia, but were divorced after five years. Parkston, South Dakota photo. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GHRC_Photo_Kulm_ND_50:
Wedding photo of Edward Grosz with his bride Hilda, and surrounding wedding ensemble circa 1921-1923 at Parkston, South Dakota. Edward’s brother, Carl Grosz (left) and Edward’s uncle Emil Grosz (right) with Emil’s wife Dora, matron of honor. Dora (right) wears trendy-fashion, hair “puffs” style during 1920-1924 only. Hilda’s sister (left) and identical twin flower girls are unidentified. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_51:
Wedding photo of Carl Grosz with his bride Nora, circa 1921-1923, at Parkston, South Dakota. Carl’s brother, Edward Grosz (right) and Emil Grosz, Carl’s uncle, of Yankton, South Dakota. Edward and Carl are sons of Nathaniel “Dan” Grosz. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_52:
Family portrait of Simon Schulz and Karolina Grosz (born 1850, Kulm, Bessarabia and died 23 January 1923 at Kulm, North Dakota) were married 27 October 1865 or 1866 (with two conflicting records) at the family house of Simon Schulz at Kulm, Bessarabia.

1) Karolina Grosz was a sister to Daniel Grosz and aunt to Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Further family history is mentioned is Deborah Rothery’s 1993 book, Ancestors & Descendants of Johann Grosz and Johann Kusler, phone (503) 287-0151, 1915 M.E. 56th Avenue, Portland, OR (Oregon) 97213. It is currently available for in house research at the Germans from Russia Heritage Collection.

2) Simon Schulz, the son of Johann Schulz, was born in Kulm, Bessarabia on 16 August 1846 and died 27 October 1935 at Elgin, North Dakota.

3) Circa 1888 photo: (back) Magdalena, Emilia, Maria, and Augusta. (center) Willamena, Karolina (mother), Simon (father). (front) Otto, Solomon, and John.

4) Children of Simon Schulz and Karolina Grosz Schulz: Willamena Schulz married Philip Mayer, Magdalena Schulz married Gottfried Schelske, Emilia Schulz [born 1872 in Neu-Posttal (Wittenberg), Bessarabia], married John Bader.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_53:
Family portrait of Emmanuel Bader (born in Paris, Bessarabia), and wife Maria Schulz Bader [born 1874, Neu-Posttal (Wittenberg) Bessarabia] with three children, circa 1899-1906. Emmanuel Bader and family lived near Parkston and Bridgewater, South Dakota. Maria Schulz Bader was daughter of Karolina Grosz Schulz, who was an aunt to Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Maria Schulz Bader was a first cousin to Magdalena. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_54:
Family portrait of Emmanuel Bader and Maria Schulz Bader with son Edward Bader, circa 1920’s, from Bridgewater and Parkston, South Dakota. Maria Schulz Bader is a first cousin to Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_55:
Family portrait of Emmanuel Bader and Maria Schulz Bader with son Edward Bader with his wife and daughter, circa 1940’s, at Bridgewater, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_56:
Open casket portrait of Mrs. Samuel Bader, a cousin to Justina Dietrich (Mrs. Johann Grosz, Senior). Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_57:
Circa 1910 funerary photo, of casket with floral memorials and Bessarabian textiles displayed to honor Grosz or Gaeckle families, who were founder first settlers of Kulm, North Dakota. Their Bessarabian villages of origins are Kulm, Beresina, and Paris for the Grosz family, while Wittenberg, Tarutino, and Kulm for the Gaeckle family.

Photographer was “Abbie” (Fred W.) Kaempf, native of Beresian, Bessarabia, originally as business partner with Mathias Kempf. (According to young Adeline Kusler of 1919, “Abbie” (Ah-bee) Kempf was a brass horn musician in the municipal Kulm Brass Band, usually of twenty to thirty member size, which continued to a century of existence.)

Kempf was the second photographer, after John Raiman, to establish in early Kulm, North Dakota in 1890’s. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_58:
Postcard photo of Christian Kinzelmann, wife Katherina (center), and Christian's mother Frau Hinzelmann (right), with four children on their Dakota prairie homestead at Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1920. Frau Hinzelmann was an aunt to Justina Dietrich Grosz, who was born in 1849 in Beresina, Bessarabia. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_59:
Postcard photo of Christian Hinzelmann and wife Katherina with four children, posing with two white draft horses, buggy and white frame house. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_60:
Postcard photo of Christian and Katherina Hinzelmann’s four young children with blooming wild prairie flowers in homestead farmyard at Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1920. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_61:
Postcard photo with full-length coffin portrait of Frau Hinzelmann, the mother of Christian Hinzelmann during 18th to 20th of April, 1923, at Parkston, South Dakota. The Frau Hinzelmann was aunt to Justina Dietrich Grosz, who was born in 1849 in Beresina, Bessarabia. Hinzelmann origins were Paris village. Justina was the mother of Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_62:
Unidentified family portrait of Johann Grosz, Senior, born in Kulm, Bessarabia, and his wife Christina Gaeckle, born in Tarutino, Bessarabia. Their daughter-in-law: Lydia Grosz (born in 1868) was the oldest child of Daniel and Justina Grosz, also oldest sister to Magdalena Grosz Kusler. [To avoid confusion: Johann Grosz, Junior, also had a younger brother Daniel Grosz and younger sister Lydia.] Photographer was E. E. Heckenlaible, Menno, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_63:
The Parkston High School building with cupola was built circa 1897-1905. This postcard photo was sent from “Dan’s” son Carl P. Grosz, who was attending “the English school” (Parkston High School) South Dakota, circa 1910, to his first cousin Albert Grosz, son of “Aunt Lydia” Grosz Grosz and John Grosz, Junior, at McClusky, North Dakota in Sheridan County. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_64:
Unidentified portrait group of four children of George Gaeckle, Senior, and Lydia Grosz, who were married in 1886 in Scotland, Dakota Territory.

[Notes from Gaeckle Family History in GRHC Archives]: George Gaeckle, Senior, was born circa 1865 in Wittenberg (Neu-Posttal), Bessarabia. Lydia Grosz was born in Kulm, Bessarabia, circa 1867. In 1888 they moved briefly to Emmons County before relocating in 1893 to Kulm, North Dakota, in southwest corner of LaMoure County. He started a business enterprise of “Gackle and Billingmier.”

When he was widowed in 1914, George Gackle, Senior, married his second wife Martha Hiller and moved to Minneapolis, active in the grain trade exchange. He turned over his Kulm business to his three oldest sons: John G. Gackle (born 1889), Martin Wesley Gackle (born 1894), and Gottfried.

Although Clara Grosz was first child born in Kulm on 20 December 1893: 1) George Gackle, Senior, (wife Lydia Grosz); 2) John Grosz, Senior., (wife Christina Gackle, second daughter [only child to America] of Johann Gaeckle and Christina Heier married 8 November 1843 in Wittenberg (Neu-Posttal), Bessarabia, moving to Tarutino, Bessarabia; John Gaeckle’s parents were Phillip Jacob Gaeckle and Katherine Magdalena Stern; Christian Heier’s parents were Georg Friedrich Heier and Karolina Sauter.) and 3) George Elhard were the founders of Kulm, North Dakota.

The four children of George Gackle and Lydia Grosz Gackle were: Martin Wesley Gackle (born 1894 as first baby boy in Kulm, North Dakota); died September 1958 married in 1917 Florence Strelow, who was born 1896 at Casselton, North Dakota. John G. Gackle (born 10 March 1889, in Emmons County, Dakota Territory, near Williamsport, died 24 May 1956, Kulm, North Dakota) married 8 June 1910 Margaret Wolfer, born September 1891; George (Gottlieb?) Gackle, Junior (born in circa 1896), married Berth Hildebrandt (born 1901; Scotland, South Dakota); and Emma Gackle (born September 1892, Kulm, North Dakota [Why was not she first child born inKulm?] moved to Lodi, California in 1923 where she died in 1966); Emma married 10 September 1909, Christopher Hieb (born 18 November 1885 and died 1973 in Lodi, California). [Mrs. Gottlieb Gackle could not identify these Grosz photos in May, 2002.] Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_64A:
Circa 1908 portrait of unidentified Gackle/Grosz ladies in Kulm, North Dakota. [Mrs. Gottlieb Gackle refuted these two ladies as following two Emma women]: 1) Emma Grosz (born circa 1888 in Scotland, Dakota Territory, daughter of Johann Grosz, Senior and Christina Gackle, who married Peter Burdening). 2) Emma Gackle (born September 1892 of parents George Gackle, Senior, and Lydia Grosz Gackle, who married Christopher Hieb on 10 September 1909).

Textile notation: The traditional Bessarabian dress for winter’s dark silk and wool, contrasting with white and gingham cotton (serepta) for summer wear. Highlighted are the silk appliqué skirt borders so traditional for Bessarabian Germans. Photography is “Abbie” Kempf, photographer in Kulm, North Dakota (a native Kämpf of Beresina, Bessarabia). Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_65:
Cameo portrait, circa 1897 has blonde man identified as a Gackle, by Stacey Gackle in May, 2002. Were these two men the owners of “Gackle and Billigmeier” merchandise store in Kulm, North Dakota? who transferred store ownership in 1914 to three oldest sons, John, Martin, and Gottfried Gackle. Were they George Gackle, Senior, and George Billigmeier? Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_66:
Cameo portrait of two Grosz sisters are: Emilia Grosz (born 1877, in Kulm, Bessarabia) (Mrs. George Billigmeier) and Christina Grosz (born 1880, Scotland, Dakota Territory) (Mrs. Peter Billigmeier). Their parents were Johann Grosz, Senior (one of three founders of Kulm, North Dakota) (born 1846, Kulm, Bessarabia) and Christina Gaeckle (corn 1847 in Alt-Posttal, Bessarabia). This photograph was owned by Johann Grosz, Senior and Christina Gackle Grosz. Magdalena Grosz Kusler’s oldest sister Lydia Grosz married Johann Grosz, Junior, the oldest brother of two Grosz sisters Emilia and Christina. The photographer was Eliason, Alexandria, South Dakota, circa 1902. Identity is not verified. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_67:
This elaborate portrait of Grosz of Gaeckle infant, in wicker perambulator with lace parasol/ “Regenshirm,” was sent to grandparents Johann Grosz, Senior, and wife Christina Gaeckle Grosz, circa 1895-1915. Photographer is C.T. Lee Studio, Rolla, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_68:
Portrait of Gackle/Grosz infant, whose grandparents (Johann Grosz, Senior, and Christina Gaeckle Grosz) were founders of Kulm, North Dakota, as well as origins in Kulm and Alt-Posttal, Bessarabia. An experimental double-exposure print by Christ Krause, a wealthy fellow Bessarabian photographer, Kulm, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_69:
Portrait of unidentified Grosz cousins as Victorian fashion youngsters, circa 1890’s. Photographer is R.L. Beattie, Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Textile_Kulm_ND_01: EPRHCC#________:
Associated with a wealthy elderly man, this man’s satin silk neck-warmer was worn during winter worship in the unheated church sanctuary. Common people usually wore woolen neck-warmers. This silk neck-warmer is lined and quilted for further comfort. Courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

 

Our appreciation is extended to Adeline Kusler McCloy for use of these photographs.

Permission to use any images from the GRHC website may be requested by contacting Michael M. Miller
North Dakota State University Libraries
Germans from Russia Heritage Collection
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