Home History Culture Photographs

Kusler-Grosz Family Collection

Kulm, North Dakota

Kusler Family Photographs


Family Histories:
1. Kusler, Walter M. The Kuslers and their descendents. Kulm, ND: W. Kusler, 1983. *Germans from Russia CS71.K969 1983.
2. Piatz, Lorraine Leier. Family history of Joseph Leier & Caroline (Grosz) Leier & Clara (Grosz) Leier. Napoleon, ND: Napoleon Homestead, 1996. *Germans from Russia CS71.L525 1996.


Town & County Histories:
1. Flegel, Zona. The origin of Kulm. np: np, nd. *Institute for Regional Studies Small Collection 425.
2. Freeman, Mike. Menno, the first 100 years, 1879-1979. Menno, SD: the City of Menno, 1979. *Germans from Russia F659.M46F73 1979.

3. Hutchinson County, South Dakota 1880 census. Lakewood, Ohio: R. J. Seibert, 1980. *Germans from Russia F657.H85H87.

4. Kulm centennial, 1892-1992. np: The Centennial Book Committee, 1992. *Institute for Regional Studies F644.K85K86 1992.
5 . Kulm diamond jubilee, Kulm, North Dakota: June 26 & 27, 1967. Kulm, ND: J. E. Peters, 1967. *Institute for Regional Studies F644.K85K85 1967.

6. Kulm, N. Dak., 1892 to 1957. Kulm, ND: The Committee, 1957. *Institute for Regional Studies F644.K85K85 1957.
7 . Parkston, South Dakota, centennial history. Parkston, SD: Joan M. Hafner and the Parkston Commercial Club, 1985. *Germans from Russia F659.P37P37 1985.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_01:
Circa 1892 portrait of Anna “Maria” Schäfer born (1810 in Baden Germany) married Valentin Schäfer (born in Bavarian Palatinate, 1807: west of Rhine River) in the Beresan district village of Worms, Cherson, South Russia. They are great-great grandparents to Adeline Kusler. (Family “Bodenteppich” striped rug is in photo). The circa 1892 photo is by Gibson Photo of Scotland, South Dakota. Anna “Maria” and Valentin Schäfer immigrated in 1872 to Sandusky, Ohio, with her daughter (guardian), Christina Schäfer Kusler (Mrs. Johann Kusler, Senior) to Lesterville, Dakota Territory (Hutchinson County). “Maria” lived to be 90 years old after 1900 U. S. Census was completed in Christina’s home. (Christina later moved in 1902 to rural post office Picardsville, North Dakota, [eight miles west of McClusky] after Maria’s death). Valentin Schäfer died between 1883-1900. Valentin and “Maria” Schäfer were buried in old pioneer graveyard of Odessa Reformed Church on northeast quarter of Section 31, on homestead land (south of Scotland village) originally owned by John Kusler, Senior and later owned by Karl Schaefer.

“Maria” was born in 1810 in Baden, Germany according to 1880 U.S. Census records. She immigrated in the “second group” to America in 1872 to wait in Sandusky, Ohio, while sending out land survey/scouts to Yankton, Dakota. She was the mother of seven children, with three children still living in 1900. Her son, Heinrich Schaefer is also buried at Odessa Reformed Cemetery, under a large tree whose leafy canopy covered three graves on either side of his burial place. However, Heinrich’s wife, Magdalena (Eissinger) Schaefer is buried at Petersburg Church cemetery.

Great-great grandfather Valentin Schäfer was born in 1807. The 1880 U. S. Census gives his birthplace as “Bavaria,” but actually “Bavarian Palatinate;” located west of the Rhine river or “Pfalz,” to be later known as the “Rhineland-Pfalz” or “Rhine Palatinate.” The historic Kusler family also originated from the Rhineland Palatinate. “Maria” Schäfer’s seven children have only two siblings yet identified: Walter Kusler’s grandmother, Christina Schaefer (Mrs. John Kusler, Senior) and Gordon Auch’s great-grandfather Heinrich Schaefer. Possible third sibling is Katherina Schaefer who married Jacob Kusler. Upon being widowed after 1902 at Picardsville, North Dakota, she remarried to a Mr. Heitzmann, of a Leibenthaler German family from neighboring McClusky and Denhoff (Sheridan County), before moving to Minot, North Dakota.

[Katherina Schaefer Kusler probably remarried to a Heitzmann cousin of Frederich “Fred” Junior, (three generations of the same name), and his brothers Benjamin, Herbert, and Adam at McClusky and Denhoff, North Dakota.] [This source from Lena Heitzmann Paris who was too young to know name of older cousin.] Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_02:
Sixtieth wedding anniversary portrait of Johann Kusler, Senior (1846-1921) and Christina Schaefer Kusler in 1920 at Fredonia, North Dakota. Johann was born in Worms, Beresan district, Kherson, and married Christina Schaefer, also of Worms village, in 1860. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_03:
Family portrait of Johann Kusler, Senior (1846-1921) and Christina Schaefer Kusler (1847-1928), circa 1902, with surviving son Willie (not Wilhelm), Martha, and August, circa 1892, by photographer Gibbon, at Scotland, South Dakota. From their ancestral village of Worms, Beresan district, Cherson (north of city of Odessa), Johann Kusler and Christina Schaefer immigrated as the “second group” to America in 1871, via Sandusky, Ohio, to Lesterville, South Dakota. (Notice vividly colored stripes of “Bodenteppich,” hand-woven floor rug.) Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_04:
Family portrait of Johann Kusler, Senior (1846-1921) and Christina Schaefer Kusler (1847-1928) circa 1902, with younger siblings. After Anna “Maria” Schäfer’s death, they traveled to visit family relatives in Sandusky, Ohio region as documented by this photography of Stanton Photo Novelty Company, Springfield, Ohio. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_05:
Johann Kusler, Senior’s brother Walter Kusler with his children, circa 1900, with photography by Kolbs (historic German family from South Russia), Scotland, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_06:
Walter Kusler, brother of Johann Kusler, Senior, had this photograph of his four children, circa 1904, from Orth’s Studio, Scotland, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_07:
Johann Kusler, Junior of Scotland, South Dakota, was married on 2 January 1894, at Scotland, South Dakota, to Magdalena Grosz of Parkston, South Dakota. Photographer was A. Gibbon, Parkston, South Dakota. Magdalena wears large grosgrain silk ribbon bow in her hair “pug” with streamers cascading down her bodice, while traditional white “Liebsband” silk waist sash cascades to her skirt hem. Johann wears groom’s boutonniere with narrow ribbons in the groom’s fashion of Beresan district. (Note traditional woolen “Bodenteppich,” floor rug.) Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_08:
Older children of Johann Kusler, Junior, and Magdalena Grosz Kusler were Edward Kusler (right) and sister Emma (left) (later Mrs. John Doering) at Parkston, South Dakota, circa 1899 photo. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_09:
Family portrait of Johann Kusler, Junior, and Magdalena Grosz Kusler at Kulm, North Dakota circa 1914. (Back, left to right) Edward Kusler, Emma Kusler Doering, Edmond Kusler, Clara Kusler Mayer, Willie Kusler; (Front, left to right) Alitha Kusler Fireoved, Magdalena (mother), Emilia Kusler Miller (center), Selma Kusler Skoglund Maskie, John (father), and Ida Kusler Grosz. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_10:
Emil Kusler, brother of Johann Kusler, Junior, with his mother Christina Schaefer Kusler, 1894, at Lynch, Nebraska. The Kusler family moved back to Oak Hollow township, Hutchinson county, near Scotland, South Dakota before the U. S. Census, which was dated 7 June 1900. Christina was daughter, care-giver for elderly Anna “Maria” Schäfer, in 1900 census but died before the Johann Kusler, Senior, family further moved and homesteaded in 1902 near Fredonia (originally Dennowitz), North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_12:
Johann Kusler, Junior and Magdalena Grosz Kusler celebrated their sixtieth wedding anniversary on January 2, 1954 at Kulm, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_13:
Photo portrait of 17-year-old Gottlieb, brother of Johann Kusler, Junior with J. Orth Photography at Scotland, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_15:
Rare depiction of Beresaner German owner’s wood-frame farm house being erected in Antelope Township, McIntosh County (south of Kulm, North Dakota), circa 1916, for John Kusler, Junior (and wife Magdalena Grosz Kusler). Two Kusler sons at ground level with family dog are (left) Edward Kusler, (center) Willie Kusler, and (right) father John Kusler, Junior. The four men on the roof and scaffolding are unidentified. Adeline Kusler, youngest daughter, was born in this farm house, before living in a town house in Kulm during 1920s. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_16:
A rare photo of church district conference of over fifty people hosted at Gnadenfeld Congregational Church [oldest "classis" church in North Dakota, circa 1940s, south of Kulm, in Antelope Township (R67W:T131N), McIntosh County. The wood-frame structure was later reused as a granary at Robert (Bobbie) Hollan’s farm. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_17:
Unidentified church on Bulkeley Street in Edgeley, North Dakota, circa 1910, as a postcard photo by Ravely Photography Studio at Edgeley. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_18:
“Tea-Totaler” pranksters spoof, circa 1920, due to North Dakota’s Prohibition Laws from 1889 statehood to national repeal during 1933. (Left) Emmanual Rasch (born at Kulm, North Dakota, and descendant of Alt-Elft and Arciz villages in Bessarabia) and (right) Edmund Kusler (born 1901 south of Kulm), older brother to Adeline Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_20:
Justina Dietrich Kusler (born 6 August 1849 in Beresina, Bessarabia) mother of Magdalena Grosz Kusler, is photographed circa 1923 or 1924. Justina was the only identified person (seated front row center) at a national-level German Congregational Church Conference, which was held during June 1912 at Kulm, North Dakota (page ninety in the 1992 Kulm Centennial history book). Justina, Mrs. Johann Grosz, Senior. died in 1928 in Parkston, South Dakota. Photo Courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_70:
Newspaper photograph of handsomely seated pose of Salomon Wenslaff, who became editor in 1874 of the Dakota Freie Presse, in Aberdeen, South Dakota, which photo clippings (after 1902) were kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_71:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from the Dakota Freie Presse, identifying Johann Weber, wife and eleven children, Cleveland, North Dakota, arrived at Yankton, (South Dakota) in 1873 from Worms village, Beresan district, with same origins as the Kusler and Schaefer families. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_72:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from the Dakota Freie Presse, identifying young couple, nee Weber, at Cleveland North Dakota, with origins from Worms village, Beresan district. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_73:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from Dakota Freie Presse kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler; J.H. Kaufmann family portrait from Ruth Center, Kansas, with eight adult children. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_74:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from Dakota Freie Presse kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler: seated family portrait of Jacob Baumann with wife and young daughter, Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_75:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from Dakota Freie Presse kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler: School teacher Rev. Klose with wife and young son. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_76:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from Dakota Freie Presse kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler: A. Reimann, Parkston, South Dakota, brother to John Reimann who was photographer at Parkston before relocating in 1892 to Kulm, North Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_77:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from Dakota Freie Presse kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler: John Pietz, Eureka, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_78:
Newspaper photograph (after 1902) from Dakota Freie Presse kept by Magdalena Grosz Kusler: Conrad Berreth and wife, Parkston, South Dakota. Photo courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_79:
There is no actual photo for #79, as it helps with the numerical counting of the collection of photos.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_80:
Five youngest daughters of Johann Kusler, Junior, and Magdalena (Maggie) Grosz Kusler, all born at family farm south of Kulm, North Dakota (top to bottom):
*Adeline McCloy (1919-_____), photo donator and historian;
*Selma Skoglund Maskie (1915-2000), family curator/ “keeper”;
*Alitha Fireoved (1913-2001);
*Ida Grosz (1910-1997);
*Emilia Miller (1907-______).

This photo was taken at last family reunion, 12 February 1997. Photo is courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_81:
Portrait photo of Adeline Kusler McCloy, Cambridge, Minnesota on 8 October 2001. Adeline is displaying a folded portion of her "Blachte"/ Kanapee woolen shawl, which she inherited from her grandmother, Justina Dietrich Grosz, Parkston, South Dakota. Photo is courtesy of Jay Gage, GRHC curator.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_82:
Full-length photo of Adeline Kusler McCloy, Cambridge, Minnesota on 8 October 2001. Photo is courtesy of Jay Gage, GRHC curator.
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_83: GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_84:
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_85: GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_86:
GRHC_Photo_Kulm_ND_83-86:
Bunte Blachte (Plachte)/ woolen kanapee shawl/ "paradies-decken" from Justina Dietrich Grosz of Paris, Bessarabia to her granddaughter, Adeline, during April 2002.

**This Kusler-Grosz Photographic collection has a total of eighty-three photographic images. The only exception is photo #64A, which is not in regular numerical sequence (especially significant for textile history).

Textiles used for Evangelical-Lutheran worship traditions: Donated to GRHC on 8 December 2001 by Adeline Kusler McCloy, a native of Kulm, North Dakota, formerly living in Cambridge, Minnesota.

Textiles are provenance of Magdalena Grosz Kusler and her mother Justina Dietrich Grosz to the ownership of Justina’s Dietrich parents of Beresina village in Bessarabia. Justina’s mother was related with the Bader family in Paris village in Bessarabia. Although these textiles could have been inherited through Daniel Grosz’s parents, concensus favors the Dietrich family, who immigrated to Neuberg village circa 1810 in the Liebental Am Baraboi district situated west of city of Odessa, before they resettled in Bessarabia.

GRHC_Textile_Kulm_ND_01: EPRHCC#________:
Associated with a wealthy elderly man, this man’s satin silk neck-warmer was worn during winter worship in the unheated church sanctuary. Common people usually wore woolen neck-warmers. This silk neck-warmer is lined and quilted for further comfort. Courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

GRHC_Textile_Kulm_ND_02: EPRHCC#________:
With continuous loop-knitted black-woolen hand-covering for widows to cover their hands during prayer in church meeting. Widows also wore this round cloth on their head during home devotions and prayer during specified hours/ “stunden” in their domestic household. Younger women and girls had either white or brightly embroidered prayer cloths. Courtesy of Adeline Kusler McCloy.

 

Our appreciation is extended to Adeline Kusler McCloy for use of these photographs.

Permission to use any images from the GRHC website may be requested by contacting Michael M. Miller
North Dakota State University Libraries
Germans from Russia Heritage Collection
Libraries
NDSU Dept #2080
PO Box 6050
Fargo, ND 58108-6050
Tel: 701-231-8416
Fax: 701-231-6128
Last Updated:
Director: Michael M. Miller
North Dakota State University Library North Dakota State University North Dakota State University GRHC Home