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Schmaltz, John Family Photos

Photographs Contributed by Dr. Eric J. Schmaltz


Related Articles:

Schmaltz, Dr. Eric J. "From the Black Sea to North Dakota and Beyond:  John Schmaltz’s Russian Passport from 1898." January 2010.

Series of articles, "The John Schmaltz family of Emmons County: from Ukrainian Steppes to Dakota Prairies," Emmons County Record, 2008 and 2009


1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 1-2.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 3-4.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 5-6.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 7-8.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 9-10.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 11-12.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 13-14.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 15-16.
1898 Russian passport for John Schmaltz page 17-18.
The gravestone of Germans from Russia immigrants John and Clara (Bullinger) Schmaltz in St. Anthony’s Catholic Cemetery in Linton, Emmons County, North Dakota. For some reason, no death date of 1953 was carved into Clara’s side of the marker.
Learning the trade from his immigrant father, Leo Schmaltz (1923-1987) butchering meat at his Super Valu store in Washburn, McLean County, North Dakota, ca. 1960s.
Following in his immigrant father’s footsteps, Leo Schmaltz (1923-1987) curing sausage at his Super Valu store in Washburn, McLean County, North Dakota, ca. 1960s.
The 1948 wedding portrait of Leo Schmaltz (1923-1987) and Eunice (Germain) Schmaltz (1925-1993) in Minot, Ward County, North Dakota.
Schmaltz Family portrait taken in 1944 in Emmons County around the time of Margaret (Schmaltz) Materi’s funeral. The family actually inserted a previous picture of her face into this group photo (see far left). John and Clara (Bullinger) Schmaltz produced 17 children (one son died in infancy), making the family the largest in North Dakota at one time.
All seven Schmaltz boys striking a handsome pose in Strasburg, Emmons County, North Dakota, ca. early 1930s.
Immigrants John Schmaltz (1879-1951) and Clara (Bullinger) Schmaltz (1884-1953) spending their twilight years in Linton, Emmons County, North Dakota, ca. late 1940s.
Another branch of the Kandel village Schmaltzes who settled in Emmons County, North Dakota: The iron cross of Magdelena Schmaltz at St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery in Hague. The sign reads: "Hier ruht in Gott Magdelena Schmaltz, Geb. 8 Sept. 1859, Gest. 17 Juni 1908" ("Here rests in God, Magdelena Schmaltz, Born on 8 Sept. 1859, Died on 17 June 1908").
Schmaltz Meats coffee mug, Linton, Emmons County, North Dakota. This local collector's item appeared for a time around the 1990s. The family business was founded in 1910 and operated for nearly four generations until 2006.
All nine Schmaltz girls arrayed in their summer outfits in Strasburg, Emmons County, North Dakota, ca. mid- to late 1930s.
An early photo of John and Clara (Bullinger) Schmaltz and their children posing in front of the Meat Market in Strasburg, Emmons County, North Dakota, in 1914. The store opened in 1910 and was sold in 1945. In 1926, John expanded the business with a meat market in Linton, which remained in family hands until 2006. This photograph courtesy of the North Dakota State University Libraries’ Germans from Russia Heritage Collection, Fargo.
Germans from Russia immigrant John Schmaltz (1879-1951) working behind his Meat Market counter in Strasburg, Emmons County, North Dakota, September 1934, only a couple of years before he moved to nearby Linton.
Meat section inside Leo Schmaltz’s (1923-1987) Super Valu store in Washburn, McLean County, North Dakota, ca. 1960s.
The front of Leo Schmaltz’s (1923-1987) Super Valu store in Washburn, McLean County, North Dakota, ca. 1960s.
As a young graduate student, Eric J. Schmaltz (b. 1971) worked for two summers in 1994 and 1995 at the North Dakota State University Libraries Germans from Russia Heritage Collection in Fargo.
The first and only Schmaltz family reunion held in Linton, Emmons County, North Dakota, in the summer of 1985. Standing here were John Sr.’s surviving children and their spouses. (Front row left to right): Clara and Leo Schall, Agatha Truax. (Back row left to right): Michael, Mary Heer, Cra, Eunice and Leo, Doc and Agnes, Eva, and Hugo.
Pictures of the Alsace and Rhineland Palatinate regions, the first traditional homeland of the Schmaltz family, along the modern French-German border, late spring 1993.
Two photos (sources unknown) of Bishop Antonius Zerr (1849-1934), an ethnic German from the village of Franzfeld near Odessa, Ukraine, and later the Catholic bishop of Tiraspol Diocese. As Soviet persecution of religion intensified in the early 1930s, the elderly bishop ordained young priests and administered to the pastoral needs of the local population in secret. His final days were spent in the German village of Kandel under the personal care of widow and mother of seven children, Barbara Schmalz (1899-1937). She also had participated in clandestine religious activities with his assistance. After his death, Communist authorities arrested Mrs. Schmalz and detained her for almost two years. In 1937, she was sentenced to death and shot for her religious dissident activities, one of many millions of victims at the height of Stalin’s terror.

 


Permission to use any images from the GRHC website may be requested by contacting Michael M. Miller
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