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Home African Diaspora: Resources available at the library

African Diaspora: Resources available at the library

The NDSU Libraries are seeking new ways to support interdisciplinary programs on campus and one area we have focused on this academic year is African Diaspora Studies. With the hiring of Dr. Kristen Fellows (Assistant Professor of Anthropology) and the offering of new courses on this topic, the NDSU Libraries wanted to highlight two new e-Book resources and three additional items in our collection that can help you learn more about African Diaspora.

Each of these five resources can be used by students, faculty, and staff at all levels of research, teaching, and learning. You can access e-Book titles on and off-campus and can even download full chapters as PDFs for offline reading. Please contact Jylisa Doney (Social Sciences Librarian) or Lisa Eggebraaten (Humanities Librarian) if you have any questions about these resources.

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"238","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"400","style":"width: 150px; height: 221px; margin: 5px; float: left;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"271"}}]]The African Diaspora: A History through Culture (2010)

Written by Patrick Manning

Available Online (e-Book)

Columbia University Press Summary: “Patrick Manning…follows the multiple routes that brought Africans and people of African descent into contact with one another and with Europe, Asia, and the Americas…Manning shows how the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, and the Indian Ocean fueled dynamic interactions among black communities and cultures and how these patterns resembled those of a number of connected diasporas concurrently taking shaping across the globe”

 

 

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"239","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"400","style":"width: 150px; height: 229px; margin: 5px; float: left;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"262"}}]]The New African Diaspora (2009)

Edited by Isidore Okpewho and Nkiru Nzegwu

Available Online (e-Book)

Indiana University Press Summary: “The New York Times reports that since 1990 more Africans have voluntarily relocated to the United States and Canada than had been forcibly brought here before the slave trade ended in 1807…This lively and timely collection…traces the immigrants' progress from expatriation to arrival and covers the successes as well as problems they have encountered as they establish their lives in a new country.

 

 

 

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"240","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"400","style":"width: 150px; height: 222px; margin: 5px; float: left;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"270"}}]]Working Slavery, Pricing Freedom: Perspectives from the Caribbean, Africa, and the African Diaspora (2002)

Edited by Verene Shepherd

Main Library Stacks – 2nd Floor HT1105.C37 W67 2002

Amazon.com Summary: “This…collection [spans] the field of Caribbean and Atlantic world slavery, history and historiography, human and physical geography, archeology and cultural studies…[Topics] include Caribbean archeology; urban townscape and landscape; slavery and technology; slave demography; the varied contexts of slave and free labor; gender agricultural regimes on non-sugar properties, resistance; the slave trade, compensation and manumission; adjustments to emancipation and contemporary Caribbean society.”

 

 

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"241","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"400","style":"width: 150px; height: 168px; margin: 5px; float: left;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"358"}}]]Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience (2005)

Edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Kwame Anthony Appiah

Main Library Reference – 1st Floor DT14 .A37435 2005

Oxford University Press Summary: “More than 4,000 articles cover prominent individuals, events, trends, places, political movements, art forms, business and trade, religion, ethnic groups, organizations and countries on both sides of the Atlantic. African American history and culture in the present-day United States receive a strong emphasis, but African American history and culture throughout the rest of the Americas and their origins in Africa itself have an equally strong presence… Africana, Second Edition, conveys the history and scope of cultural expression of people of African descent with unprecedented depth.”

 

 

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_original","fid":"242","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"400","style":"width: 150px; height: 224px; margin: 5px; float: left;","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"268"}}]]Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from African to African Diaspora (2008)

Written by Stephanie E. Smallwood

Main Library – 2nd Floor E446 .S63 2007

Harvard University Press Summary: “This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors [and] offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market…In extraordinary detail, we witness these men and women cramped in the holds of ships, gasping for air, and trying to make sense of an unfamiliar sea and an unimaginable destination. Arriving in America, we see how these new migrants enter the market for laboring bodies, and struggle to reconstruct their social identities in the New World.”

 

 

 

By Jylisa Doney, Social Sciences Librarian

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