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Home Research Guides Finding STEM Research: Scopus and Web of Science Tutorial

Finding STEM Research: Scopus and Web of Science Tutorial


Scopus and Web of Science

Why should you use a STEM Database such as Scopus or Web of Science?

Research databases, such as Scopus or Web of Science, can improve the efficiency of your search for research articles over more general resources, such as Google, by eliminating non-scholarly results and by providing additional search features to to help you narrow your search down to the most relevant articles. This tutorial will focus on Scopus and Web of Science, two of the most widely used STEM databases. Some of the key features include:

  • Coverage across all STEM fields: Scopus and Web of Science include articles from a broad range of journal and conference proceedings across all STEM fields.
  • Research focused: Search results include only peer-reviewed and other scholarly research publications, such as conference proceedings and review articles.
  • Additional search features: Helpful features allow you to narrow results down to specific topics, authors, institutions, types of papers, and other details that you may be looking for.
  • Citation tracking: A key feature of Scopus and Web of Science is the ability to easily track citations to and within an article. This will help you find additional research that is most relevant to what you are looking for.

The tutorials to Scopus and Web of Science below will help you make the best use of these databases.

For more help finding STEM research, contact your subject librarian or request a consultation.

 

 

Accessing Scopus

There are two ways you can access Scopus. The quickest way:

  • Click the dropdown above the search box on the library homepage and select Academic Databases
  • Click on Scopus (Elsevier)

 

Searching Scopus

Below is a video showing basic searching of Scopus. (Or access the video on YouTube.)

 

The Web of Science is a collection of databases that containe information about research in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. You can choose to search all the databases included, the "Core Collection", or just a single database.

Accessing the Web of Science

There are two ways you can access Web of Science. The quickest way:

  • Click the dropwdown above the search box on the library homepage and select Academic Databases
  • Click on Web of Science: Core Collection (Clarivate Analytics)

This will take you to the Web of Science Core Collection. This version contains information about research in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities, with coverage back to 1900. Content covers over 12,000 of the highest impact journals worldwide, including Open Access journals and over 150,000 conference proceedings. This also has a few more features than the All Databases option.

To select other databases on the Web of Science platform, you can select the database of your choice from the Select a database dropdown menu on the Web of Science homepage. If you highlight an option from the list, you will see a window with text describing that database.

The All Databases option contains all of the Core Collection, plus nine other databases. For example, this includes BIOSIS (for life sciences and biomedical research), MEDLINE (The U.S. National Library of Medicine's database), and Zoological Record (the world's leading taxonomic reference and oldest database of animal biology).

If you are not sure which to use, you can pick one and then change as needed. You can also choose which database(s) you want to search once you are on the Web of Science platform.

 

Searching the Web of Science

Below is a video showing basic searching of the Web of Science: All Databases. (Or access the video on YouTube.)

 

For more videos: